Stephen Hall

In February of 2014, Aesthetica Magazine wrote that: “Stephen Hall, an artist who has been working in New York for many years, was recently part of a featured article in the New York Times and a photo essay by photographer Michael Mundy called An Afternoon With and Gallery and Studio magazine’s Ed McCormick called him “One of our more exciting Pop Surrealists.” [My Italics]

 

Feature articles have been written about Stephen in GQ, Nuovo, NY Arts, Art Business News, Gallery and Studio and Creative works among others. A solo exhibition of his work will be an important New York art event.

 

Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Stephen Hall moved to New York in 1978 and began exhibiting his work in the East Village in the early 80's. Since then, his work has been featured in exhibits throughout the US, India, Japan, Korea and Mexico. His work is part of numerous corporate and private collections and has been featured in major motion pictures, music videos and magazines. Mr. Hall has illustrated numerous book covers for internationally published authors. "Red House Mystery" A.A. Milne, "High Rise" J.G. Ballard and "A Can of Worms" by Russell Greenan to name a few. 

 

Each of Stephen’s pieces is a meta-dialogue, speaking to the viewer on one level and then engaging itself in a conversation about its very being. If the background is warm the colors in the foreground cool, chaotic patterns will argue with mundane objects, light yields darkness, the natural reprimands the man-made. Stephen may start with an interesting subject, focusing on the eyes, but will then write a visual story, making things up as he goes along, in a playful style with a devilish sense of whimsy and satire under the confines of structure and flawless technique.

 

In his activity, Stephen combines surrealistic imagination with modern form, deriving his inspirations from exotic cultures. He portrays their representatives, endowing them with slightly modern accessories in a complex bath of color and complexity. His artistic activity may be described as an attempt at restoring astonishment by way of an otherness. The Pop characteristics of advertising language are combined with a penetrating analysis of the paradoxes of modern culture. In his most current work, he explores the absurdity of man’s violence and his impact on nature.

 

 

Show More

© 2013 by Paul Calendrillo 

 

  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Facebook Classic